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Arrests on School Property
Section 5 – Juvenile Arrests on School Property


There has been much discussion about the school-to-prison pipeline[1] lately.  One of the most important developments over the past few years has been the over-reliance on arrests as a way to address perceived school discipline problems.

School officials may usually decide whether or not to involve the police in a school incident.  The Chicago Board of Education sets policies indicating when it is mandatory for school officials to notify police of alleged student misbehavior, when school officials may use their discretion in calling police, and when the police need not be involved.[2]  For example, when two people fight at school but no one is injured, the Student Code of Conduct does not require that police be notified.  School officials may use their discretion in notifying police of a fight involving more than two people or resulting in injuries.  School officials may also refrain from calling the police when a student makes any inappropriate minor physical contact with school personnel.  Project NIA and FDLA encourage schools to handle conflict among students, teachers, and administrators without resorting to a police response as often as possible.

The numbers reported below underscore the reality that many young people in Chicago are arrested directly from their schools.

For a more detailed report about school-based arrests on Chicago Public School property, you can view our new report Policing Chicago Public Schools.

Arrests at Public School Locations – Persons 17 and Under

(City of Chicago, 2009-2010)

2009

2010

% Change

5,651

5,574

-1.3%

Source: CPD Research and Development Division, Research and Analysis Section (March 11, 2011).  Includes location codes that reflect public schools buildings and public school grounds.

 

Arrests at Public School Locations by District – persons 17 and under

(City of Chicago, 2009 & 2010)

District

2009

% Total 2009

2010

% Total 2010

TOTAL

01 7 0.12 5 0.09 12
02 155 2.74 178 3.19 333
03 227 4.02 238 4.27 465
04 530 9.38 543 9.74 1,073
05 352 6.23 345 6.19 697
06 375 6.64 379 6.8 754
07 244 4.32 225 4.04 469
08 482 8.53 532 9.54 1,014
09 213 3.77 267 4.79 480
10 100 1.77 133 2.39 233
11 320 5.66 255 4.57 575
12 369 6.53 308 5.53 677
13 141 2.5 120 2.15 261
14 55 0.97 73 1.31 128
15 182 3.22 215 3.86 397
16 254 4.49 160 2.87 414
17 275 4.87 287 5.15 562
18 71 1.26 71 1.27 142
19 95 1.68 80 1.44 175
20 233 4.12 236 4.23 469
21 114 2.02 161 2.89 275
22 447 7.91 370 6.64 817
23 28 0.5 11 0.2 39
24 93 1.65 71 1.27 164
25 289 5.11 311 5.58 600
TOTAL 5,651 100.01 5,574 100 11,225

[1] The “School to Prison Pipeline” describes the reality that many young people are being pushed out of school and into the juvenile and adult legal systems because of harsh discipline policies, high stakes testing, police involvement in schools, and social oppression.

[2] Chicago Public Schools Student Code of Conduct, pages 15-28 (effective September 16, 2010) – Available at: http://www.cps.edu/Pages/StudentResourcesStudentCodeofConduct.aspx

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